Quince Sambal

This is my new discovery for this quince season and, to date. my only recipe using raw quinces in the end product!

It comes from my previous life on the southern African continent, more specifically from the four years I spent living and working in Cape Town. There I was fortunate to be able to explore the (extensive) culinary heritage of the Cape as part of my professional life:

Strictly speaking a sambal is a spicy Indonesian sauce or relish, with a strong chilli focus. In the legacy of the Cape Malay tradition, a sambal tends to be more of a marinated salad or relish, also with a strong leaning towards chillies.

This Quince Sambal is ideal for making ahead and/or keeping in the fridge for a good few days, so its worth making a big batch for the week! Traditional recipes call for salting the grated quince and then discarding the resulting liquid. That liquid is wonderful quince juice, however, and so my recipe uses the quince juice as part of the dressing.

Quince Sambal, the recipe

These quantities will make about 250ml of sambal, so multiply the quantities accordingly if you want to make more – which I strongly recommend 🙂

1 quince

1 small onion, finely chopped

2ml crushed garlic

1 small red or green chilli (or red or green pepper), finely chopped

30 ml sugar

10 ml salt (ideally celery salt)

Peel and core the quince, then grate coarsely.

Place in a bowl and sprinkle with the sugar and the salt. Mix these through thoroughly. Leave to stand overnight so that the salt and sugar are able to draw out plenty of the quince juice.

Retaining the quince juice, now mix in the remaining ingredients, adjusting the proportions to taste. Leaving the sambal to stand now for a few hours – or overnight again – greatly enhances the flavour.

Traditionally served to accompany a curry, quince sambal also goes very well with smoked fish dishes, or as a stand alone salad – drizzled with the salad oil of your choice if you prefer.

More inspiration for the quince season:

Red Wine & Chillies

Slow roasted,

our red muscatel grapes:

P1210077

and fiery,

Tom’s habanero chillies:

P1210122

That’s the main mix for our

RED MUSCATEL CHILLI CHUTNEY

homemade from our red muscatel grapes and Tom’s chillies!

Tom is serious about chillies and talks in terms of Scoville when describing his hand-reared hot crop! Fresh, dried and salsa’ed – he does it all and while I am certainly not in his league when it comes to Scoville & Co, I do know that you can’t go wrong pairing chillies and red wine (in this case, red grapes)!

P1210140

This is where you can get your jar (the chutney goes well with anything from cheeseboards, burgers of all kinds, salad dressings and dips):

https://anediblelandscape.wordpress.com/our-online-orchard-shop/.